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New Catalogue
Jacket
Published:
October 1999
ISBN:
1-85182-440-5
Price:
45/40/$55 hbk

Political Ideology in Ireland, 1541-1641

HIRAM MORGAN, Editor

This collection of essays arising out of a seminar organized by the Folger Library, Washington, provides an in-depth analysis of the period's writings. It looks at the work of Spenser and other colonial writers but also at the work of more neglected Irish writers, attempting to discern what they thought about their country and its predicament.

Contents:

Beyond Spenser:a historiographical introduction to the study of political ideas in early modern Ireland:
Hiram Morgan (University College Cork)

Giraldus Cambrensis and the Tudor conquest of Ireland:
Hiram Morgan (University College Cork)


'Neither good English nor good Irish': bi-lingualism and identity formation in sixteenth-century Ireland
Vincent Carey (State Univerity of New York, Plattsburgh)

Innovation and tradition: Irish Gaelic responses to conquest and colonization:
Marc Caball (Ireland Literature Exchange)

The Irish face of Machiavelli: Richard Beacon's Solon his follie (1594) and republican ideology in the conquest of Ireland:
Vincent Carey (State University of New York, Plattsburgh)

Poetry as politics: a view of the present state of the Faerie Queene:
Nicholas Canny (National Uinversity of Ireland, Galway)

Ideology and experience: Spenser's View and martial law in Ireland:
David Edwards (Unniversity College Cork)

The anatomy of Jacobean Ireland: Captain Barnaby Rich, Sir John Davies and the failure of Reform, 1609-22:
Eugene Flanagan (Folger Library)

Political thought of Irish Counter-Reformation churchmen: the testimony of the 'Analecta' of Bishop David Rothe:
Colm Lennon (National University of Irealnd, Maynooth)

James Ussher and the godly prince in early 17th-century Ireland:
Alan Ford (University of Durham)

Irish and Spanish cultural and political relations in the work of O'Sullivan Beare:
Clare Carroll (City University New York).

Hiram Morgan lectures in history at University College, Cork.

October 1999 256pp